Setting our sights farther

Anthony Chua

The beauty of the Philippines is, without contest, magnificent. Blessed with rich flora and fauna, the country enthralls, enchants, and captivates tourists from all over the globe. Despite many odds and fallbacks the Philippines still maintains its stature as the Pearl of the Orient Seas.
And why not? Every island in the archipelago offers exquisite beauty that leaves foreign and local tourists agape. More captivating is the fact that what the country can flaunt is not limited to its natural beauty.
The Philippines can also boast fantastic man-made feats handed down to us by our forefathers. The Banaue Rice Terraces, dubbed as the Eighth Wonder of the World and the Hanging Coffins in Sagada, Mountain Province are some examples of cultural treasures left for us to behold and wonder. Our motherland has so much to offer that an “alternative,” adventure and novelty seeking group of tourists from Europe and Japan have started flocking in. They have been attracted to the diversity and heterogeneity of the wonders of its nature and cultures of its peoples. In fact because of the natural wealth of the archipelago and the warmth and hospitality of people living in it some nationalities, such as Koreans, even decided to stay here permanently.
With the ratification of National Tourism Act of 2009, our country’s tourism sector can expect more from the government. The law, also known as RA 9593, “declares a national policy for tourism as an engine of investment, employment, growth and national development.” Through the law the government now beefs up its support to the sector, which has managed to thrive despite the global recession and H1N1 flu scare.
The Philippines and Filipinos have so many to offer to the world. We just hope that the Tourism Act would serve as a growth engine to attract foreign tourists to witness and experience what the Philippines and Filipinos really are, beyond the short-sighted and racist opinions of some about the Land of the Morning and its chosen inhabitants.

The beauty of the Philippines is, without contest, magnificent. Blessed with rich flora and fauna, the country enthralls, enchants, and captivates tourists from all over the globe. Despite many odds and fallbacks the Philippines still maintains its stature as the Pearl of the Orient Seas.
And why not? Every island in the archipelago offers exquisite beauty that leaves foreign and local tourists agape. More captivating is the fact that what the country can flaunt is not limited to its natural beauty.
The Philippines can also boast fantastic man-made feats handed down to us by our forefathers. The Banaue Rice Terraces, dubbed as the Eighth Wonder of the World and the Hanging Coffins in Sagada, Mountain Province are some examples of cultural treasures left for us to behold and wonder. Our motherland has so much to offer that an “alternative,” adventure and novelty seeking group of tourists from Europe and Japan have started flocking in. They have been attracted to the diversity and heterogeneity of the wonders of its nature and cultures of its peoples. In fact because of the natural wealth of the archipelago and the warmth and hospitality of people living in it some nationalities, such as Koreans, even decided to stay here permanently.
With the ratification of National Tourism Act of 2009, our country’s tourism sector can expect more from the government. The law, also known as RA 9593, “declares a national policy for tourism as an engine of investment, employment, growth and national development.” Through the law the government now beefs up its support to the sector, which has managed to thrive despite the global recession and H1N1 flu scare.
The Philippines and Filipinos have so many to offer to the world. We just hope that the Tourism Act would serve as a growth engine to attract foreign tourists to witness and experience what the Philippines and Filipinos really are, beyond the short-sighted and racist opinions of some about the Land of the Morning and its chosen inhabitants.

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